About The Temple

     Temple Tifereth Israel of Winthrop is an unaffiliated Jewish congregation. We provide a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere for our congregants and visitors. The Congregation is committed to preserving Jewish values and traditions.
     The Temple is located just north of Boston and is adjacent to East Boston, Logan Airport, Revere, and Chelsea. Winthrop has a population of approximately 20,000, is largely residential and is a peninsula with the Atlantic Ocean to the East and Boston Harbor to the West.
     Public transportation provides convenient low cost access to Boston, while road access to Boston, points west and south is provided by 3 tunnels below Boston Harbor. Points north of Boston, including New Hampshire and Maine, are easily reached by highways adjacent to Winthrop.

PRESIDENT: Sandra (Goldstein) Pellegrino
VICE PRESIDENTS: Dana Stone, Steven Miller
TREASURER: Dana Stone


Welcome

WE WOULD LOVE TO HAVE YOU JOIN US

PUT ASIDE ALL THE CARES OF THE WEEK AND JOIN US FOR A SHORT SERVICE ON A SATURDAY OR SUNDAY MORNING. TEMPLE TIFERETH ISRAEL OF WINTHROP WELCOMES ALL. SAY HELLO TO FRIENDS - BOTH OLD AND NEW.
REMEMBER FROM WHENCE YOU COME AND WHO YOU ARE.
SERVICES START AT 9:30 AM.

SAY THANK YOU AND GOOD LUCK TO RABBINICAL INTERN DAVID JOSLIN

Temple Breakfast

On Sunday, 23 May 2021, at 10:30 am, we will have the opportunity to say thank you and wish good luck to our rabbinical intern, David Joslin, who will be leaving us. We will do this at a going away party in his honor.

David has served as the Temple's spiritual leader for the past two years. In a very difficult period of time, David has demonstrtated his rabbinical skills by organizing and leading the Temple's virtual ongoing services in addition to his normal responsibilities at the Temple and at the Hebrew College in Newton. David has made himself available to all who needed his advice, encouragement or consolation. He has done this with wisdom, a smile and a gentle voice.

Show your appreciation for all that David has done for our Temple these past two years by coming to a farewell party in his honor. Please inform the Temple if you will be able to attend so we can prepare the appropriate amount of refreshments.



SUNDAY MORNING BREAKFASTS SCHEDULED TO RESUME IN JUNE

"God willing and the creek don't rise" and assuming the Covid-19 pandemic doesn't take a turn for the worse, we are planning on resuming Sunday morning breakfasts after services on Sunday, 6 June 2021. SAVE THE DATE! As always, the price for the Temple's breakfast is right - THERE IS NO CHARGE! Come to the Temple on Sunday mornings to pray, eat and shmooze. It's a great way to start the week!
Temple Breakfast

MAY YAHRZEITS

On the NEWSLETTER page, we have listed the yahrzeits which will occur during the month of May. If you have a yahrzeit plaque at the Temple, you can check the date of the yahrzeit and the location of the yahrzeit plaque.


Yom Yerushalayim – Jerusalem Day

Yom Yerushalayim or Jerusalem Day is an Israeli national holiday commemorating the reunification of Jerusalem and the establishment of Israeli control over the Old City in the aftermath of the June 1967 Six-Day War. The day is officially marked by state ceremonies and memorial services. This year, Yom Yerushalayim is celebrated on 10 May 2021.

Under the 1947 United Nations Partition Plan for Palestine, Jerusalem was to be an international city, neither exclusively Arab nor Jewish for a period of ten years, at which point a referendum would be held by Jerusalem residents to determine which country to join. The Jewish leadership accepted the plan, including the internationalization of Jerusalem, but the Arabs rejected the proposal.

On 15 May 1948, the day after Israel declared its independence, it was attacked by its Arab neighbors. Jordan seized East Jerusalem and the Old City. Israeli forces made a concerted attempt to dislodge them, but were unable to do so. By the end of the 1948 Arab–Israeli War, Jerusalem was left divided between Israel and Jordan. The Old City and East Jerusalem continued to be occupied by Jordan, and the Jewish residents were forced out. Under Jordanian rule, half of the Old City's fifty-eight synagogues were demolished.

This state of affairs changed in 1967 as a result of the Six-Day War. On 7 June 1967 (28 Iyar 5727), Israel captured the Old City of Jerusalem. On 12 May 1968, the government proclaimed a new holiday – Jerusalem Day – to be celebrated on the 28th of Iyar, the Hebrew date on which the divided city of Jerusalem became one. On 23 March 1998, the Knesset passed the Jerusalem Day Law, making the day a national holiday. The Chief Rabbinate of Israel declared Jerusalem Day a minor religious holiday to mark the regaining of access to the Western Wall.

The observance of Yom Yerushalayim outside of the city cannot compare to its celebration in reunited Jerusalem. In Jerusalem, in normal years, thousands of people march around the city and walk through the liberated Old City. The march ends at the Kotel (Western Wall) of the Temple Mount - Judaism's holiest site. Once everyone gets to the Kotel, there are speeches and concerts and celebratory dancing.

Jerusalem has united Jews everywhere since the time of King David. Jerusalem sustained us through 1,900 years of exile. And Jerusalem is a particularly transcendent city. It has mystical qualities that Washington, D.C., Ottawa and London lack.

Jerusalem has been the Jews’ capital — and rallying cry — for 3,000 years. It’s never been just a place. It’s always been a poem, a prayer and our ultimate peoplehood platform. In 1967, heroic Israeli soldiers reunified the city — winning a defensive war after Israel warned Jordan not to attack. The Jewish world united ecstatically.

In 1967, when Jews worldwide sang Naomi Shemer’s love song to “Jerusalem of Gold,” you felt the city’s broad appeal. Secular Zionists toasted Jerusalem’s historical, mystical power. Religious Zionist Israel toasted the historical and religious power. They united in their love of the city, which, like most loves, overlapped without being identical.

Today, Jerusalem magically mixes Kotel and Knesset, old and new, secular and sacred, East and West. To the east, muezzins chant, rabbis pray, mystics meditate, artists paint, vagrants beg, tourists gape and merchants haggle; while to the west, rock stars perform, politicians posture, scholars study, “startup-ers” program, pedestrians jaywalk and entrepreneurs haggle.

And in the blessed middle — Arabs and Jews, religious and nonreligious — put politics aside to help and heal in Hadassah Hospital’s Planet Medicine, or to huff and puff in the YMCA’s Republic of Sport, or to shop and spend in Jerusalem’s malls.

Jewish holidays without rituals are like people without homelands: They get fuzzy, abstracted, distorted and quickly forgotten. That’s why every Jew — and every Jerusalem lover — should celebrate Jerusalem Day with special rituals. One possible ritual - crying out “Next year in Jerusalem!” looks forward. Especially at this coronavirus moment, it’s not a call to our travel agent (yet) but a hopeful call for better days, for a more perfect union among our people — and among all people.

Finally, especially amid today’s toxic partisanship, when we all sing “Jerusalem of Gold,” we acknowledge differences while celebrating our bonds. We’ll salute Jerusalem’s different faces over the ages; 1967’s redemptive moment of liberation after the Arab threats of annihilation; and Jerusalem today, a first-class, modern metropolis that’s still our ancient identity oasis, our archaeological tell, our communal well, our eternal old-new foundation stone.

JCAN

1 May 2021
               

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